Today's World & History from OSU's Origins

Today's World & History from OSU's Origins

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Young people who regularly smoke pot show brain abnormalities: study 

Now that studies are showing pot-smoking may change brain chemistry, we think back to why the drug was illegalized in the first place, with Stephen Siff’s “The Illegalization of Marijuana: A Brief History.”

Filed under Marijuana smokers brains drug mind motivation emotion history Stephen Siff Illegalization of Marijuana History Origins OSU

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Pay It Forward Proposal Could Help Students Afford College

This new proposal claims that it will help the education crisis. Economic historian Lawrence Bowdish provides a history of student loans for Origins, “The Kids Aren’t Alright: The Policymaking of Student Loan Policy.” Check out how student aid’s been treated historically.

Filed under Student Loans Education Lawrence Bowdish The Kids Aren't Alright Origins OSU History

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History Talk: The Fate of Crimea, the Future of Ukraine, Part I

The world has been electrified these past weeks by the explosive events in Ukraine: a dramatic political revolution in Kyiv’s Freedom Square, the surprise annexation of Crimea into Russia, and rising tensions between Russia and the United States/European Union that are reminiscent of the darkest of Cold War days. Join hosts Leticia Wiggins and Patrick Potyondy as they talk with Myroslava MudrakSergei Zhuk, andOrigins editor Nick Breyfogle about Crimea’s rich and varied history, how Crimea was absorbed into Russia, and what the future holds for Ukraine and the Crimean peninsula.

Photo by Nessa Gnatoush

— Posted on April 10, 2014

Filed under Crimea Ukraine History Talk Kyiy Leticia Wiggins Patrick Potyondy myroslava mudrak sergei Zhuk Nick Breyfogle

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theatlantic:

In 1893, Someone Predicted We’d Wear Leggings as Pants

Predicting the future is no easy task. Fifty years ago, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov imagined the technology of 2014 and saw underground suburbs, cube-like televisions, and a widening gap between human civilization and “nature.” 
In other words, he got some things right and some things wrong. But 60 years before him, a different prognosticator laid out a different version of future—or, at least, a more fashionable one.
That guy on the left up there? He’s a policeman, circa 1960. The man in the middle is a soldier. According to  “W. Cade Gall,” who wrote in 1893 with pen-in-hand and tongue-seemingly-in-cheek, that’s what the fashions of the 1960s would look like.
Gall, in fact, did this for every decade. You can see his predictions below.
He was writing for The Strand Magazine, a British fiction and “general interest” publication that ran from the early 1890s to 1950. I found his story in the excellent Public Domain Review.
Read more. [Image: Public Domain Review]

theatlantic:

In 1893, Someone Predicted We’d Wear Leggings as Pants

Predicting the future is no easy task. Fifty years ago, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov imagined the technology of 2014 and saw underground suburbs, cube-like televisions, and a widening gap between human civilization and “nature.” 

In other words, he got some things right and some things wrong. But 60 years before him, a different prognosticator laid out a different version of future—or, at least, a more fashionable one.

That guy on the left up there? He’s a policeman, circa 1960. The man in the middle is a soldier. According to  “W. Cade Gall,” who wrote in 1893 with pen-in-hand and tongue-seemingly-in-cheek, that’s what the fashions of the 1960s would look like.

Gall, in fact, did this for every decade. You can see his predictions below.

He was writing for The Strand Magazine, a British fiction and “general interest” publication that ran from the early 1890s to 1950. I found his story in the excellent Public Domain Review.

Read more. [Image: Public Domain Review]

Filed under Fashion History Leggings Pants Strand Magazine Isaac Asimov

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The death of a great American city: why does anyone still live in Detroit?

What will be Detroit’s future? As The Guardian notes, potential for eradicating the city’s blight seems to be diminishing. 

Historian Kevin Boyle also wrote a piece for Origins on his experiences in growing up in the ‘great American city.’ We urge you to read it: “Requiem: Detroit and the Fate of Urban America.”

Filed under Kevin Boyle Detroit The Guardian Urban History Blight Midwest